May292014

Anonymous said: oh my gosh bless you for this blog!! <3 xxxxx

You’re welcome :) <3 

May192014
partybarackisinthehousetonight:

I just found this really weird mole on my hand should I get it checked&#160;??

partybarackisinthehousetonight:

I just found this really weird mole on my hand should I get it checked ??

(via standupandkeepgoing)

December192013
fitness-ecstasy:



MRI scan of a human subject from the cranium to the feet.



No words can describe how much this amazes me

fitness-ecstasy:

MRI scan of a human subject from the cranium to the feet.

No words can describe how much this amazes me

(Source: samstruecalling, via sympa-thetic)

July132013
bl-ossomed:


A donor heart beating in a mechanical system which keeps it warm, oxygenated, with nutrient enriched blood pumping through.

sorry followers if I creeped anyone out but I had to reblog this, it’s so cool

bl-ossomed:

A donor heart beating in a mechanical system which keeps it warm, oxygenated, with nutrient enriched blood pumping through.

sorry followers if I creeped anyone out but I had to reblog this, it’s so cool

(Source: science-is-everything, via sympa-thetic)

April222013

birdandmoon:

Happy spring, nature lovers! Here’s this comic on my site.

Edit: lots of discussion on my Facebook Page about whether actinomycetes are fungi or bacteria. Actinomycetes are now classified as gram-positive bacteria, though they have fungus-like characteristics. I highly recommend this book for the budding (or zoosporulating?) bacteriophile!

(via sciencematerial)

April162013
neurosciencestuff:

Scientists learn what makes nerve cells so strong
How do nerve cells — which can each be up to three feet long in humans — keep from rupturing or falling apart?
Axons, the long, cable-like projections on neurons, are made stronger by a unique modification of the common molecular building block of the cell skeleton. The finding, which may help guide the search for treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, was reported in the April 10 issue of Neuron by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine.
Microtubules are long, hollow cylinders that are a component of the cytoskeleton in all cells of the body. They also support transport of molecules within the cell and facilitate growth. They are made up of polymers of a building-block substance called tubulin.
“Except for neurons, cells’ microtubules are in constant dynamic flux — being taking apart and rebuilt,” says Scott Brady, professor and head of anatomy and cell biology at UIC and principal investigator on the study. But only neurons grow so long, he said, and once created they must endure throughout a person’s life, as much as 80 to 100 years. The microtubules of neurons are able to withstand laboratory conditions that cause other cells’ microtubules to break apart.
Brady had been able to show some time ago that the neuron’s stability depended on a modification of tubulin.
“But when we tried to figure out what the modification was, we didn’t have the tools,” he said.
Yuyu Song, a former graduate student in Brady’s lab and the first author of the study, took up the question. “It was like a detective story with many possibilities that had to be ruled out one by one,” she said. Song, who is now a post-doctoral fellow at Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Yale School of Medicine, used a variety of methods to determine the nature of the modification and where it occurs.
She found that tubulin is modified by the chemical bonding of polyamines, positively charged molecules, at sites that might otherwise be chinks where tubulin could be broken down, causing the microtubules to fall apart. She was also able to show that the enzyme transglutaminase was responsible for adding the protective polyamines.
The blocking of a vulnerable site on tubulin would explain the extraordinary stability of neuron microtubules, said Brady. However, convincing others required the “thorough and elegant work” that Song brought to it, he said. “It’s such a radical finding that we needed to show all the key steps along the way.”
The authors also note that increased microtubule stability correlates with decreased neuronal plasticity — and both occur in the process of aging and in some neurodegenerative diseases. Continued research, they say, may help identify novel therapeutic approaches to prevent neurodegeneration or allow regeneration.

neurosciencestuff:

Scientists learn what makes nerve cells so strong

How do nerve cells — which can each be up to three feet long in humans — keep from rupturing or falling apart?

Axons, the long, cable-like projections on neurons, are made stronger by a unique modification of the common molecular building block of the cell skeleton. The finding, which may help guide the search for treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, was reported in the April 10 issue of Neuron by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine.

Microtubules are long, hollow cylinders that are a component of the cytoskeleton in all cells of the body. They also support transport of molecules within the cell and facilitate growth. They are made up of polymers of a building-block substance called tubulin.

“Except for neurons, cells’ microtubules are in constant dynamic flux — being taking apart and rebuilt,” says Scott Brady, professor and head of anatomy and cell biology at UIC and principal investigator on the study. But only neurons grow so long, he said, and once created they must endure throughout a person’s life, as much as 80 to 100 years. The microtubules of neurons are able to withstand laboratory conditions that cause other cells’ microtubules to break apart.

Brady had been able to show some time ago that the neuron’s stability depended on a modification of tubulin.

“But when we tried to figure out what the modification was, we didn’t have the tools,” he said.

Yuyu Song, a former graduate student in Brady’s lab and the first author of the study, took up the question. “It was like a detective story with many possibilities that had to be ruled out one by one,” she said. Song, who is now a post-doctoral fellow at Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Yale School of Medicine, used a variety of methods to determine the nature of the modification and where it occurs.

She found that tubulin is modified by the chemical bonding of polyamines, positively charged molecules, at sites that might otherwise be chinks where tubulin could be broken down, causing the microtubules to fall apart. She was also able to show that the enzyme transglutaminase was responsible for adding the protective polyamines.

The blocking of a vulnerable site on tubulin would explain the extraordinary stability of neuron microtubules, said Brady. However, convincing others required the “thorough and elegant work” that Song brought to it, he said. “It’s such a radical finding that we needed to show all the key steps along the way.”

The authors also note that increased microtubule stability correlates with decreased neuronal plasticity — and both occur in the process of aging and in some neurodegenerative diseases. Continued research, they say, may help identify novel therapeutic approaches to prevent neurodegeneration or allow regeneration.

February202013

ma-utopie said: Many fast foods such as French fries are cooked in oils rather than in water. Why is this done and how could frequent consumption of these foods be a health concern? Your help is much appreciated! :)

Vegetable oils have higher boiling points than water. This means that foods can be cooked or fried at higher temperatures than they can be cooked or boiled in water. Food cooked in vegetable oils can be cooked faster and have a different flavour. oils contain Saturated fats and trans fats, these increase your cholesterol and can be stacked upon each other which can lead to blocked arteries, and cause cardiovascular problems. 

January142013

truebluemeandyou:

DIY Science Nail Art Tutorials from Cosmetic Proof. Top Photo: Neuro Nails from Cosmetic Proof here. Bottom Photos: Molecular Nails (spelling out message) from Cosmetic Proof here. For more cool nail art -including more Molecular nail art - go to Cosmetic Proof’s site and Tumblr site. First seen at Pineneedle Collective here.

(via fuckyeahnailart)

December182012
neurosciencestuff:

New immune therapy successfully treats brain tumors in mice
Using an artificial protein that stimulates the body’s natural immune system to fight cancer, a research team at Duke Medicine has engineered a lethal weapon that kills brain tumors in mice while sparing other tissue. If it can be shown to work in humans, it would overcome a major obstacle that has hampered the effectiveness of immune-based therapies.
The protein is manufactured with two arms – one that exclusively binds to tumor cells and another that snags the body’s fighter T-cells, spurring an attack on the tumor. In six out of eight mice with brain tumors, the treatment resulted in cures, according to findings published Dec. 17, 2012, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
“This work represents a revival of a somewhat old concept that targeting cancer with tumor-specific antigens may well be the most effective way to treat cancer without toxicity,” said senior author John H. Sampson, M.D., PhD, a neurosurgeon at The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke. “But there have been problems with that approach, especially for brain tumors. Our therapeutic agent is exciting, because it acts like Velcro to bind T-cells to tumor cells and induces them to kill without any negative effects on surrounding normal tissues.”
Sampson and colleagues focused on the immune approach in brain tumors, which are notoriously difficult to treat. Despite surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, glioblastomas are universally fatal, with a median survival of 15 months.
Immunotherapies, in which the body’s B-cells and T-cells are triggered to attack tumors, have shown promise in treating brain and other cancers, but have been problematic in clinical use. Treatments have been difficult to administer at therapeutic doses, or have spurred side effects in which the immune system also attacks healthy tissue and organs.
Working to overcome those pitfalls, the Duke-led researchers designed a kind of connector - an artificial protein called a bispecific T-cell engager, or BiTE – that tethers the tumor to its killer. Their newly engineered protein includes fractions of two separate antibodies, one that recruits and engages the body’s fighter T-cells and one that expressly homes in on an antigen known as EGFRvIII, which only occurs in cancers.
Once connected via the new bispecific antibody, the T-cells recognize the tumor as an invader, and mount an attack. Normal tissue, which does not carry the tumor antigen, is left unscathed.

neurosciencestuff:

New immune therapy successfully treats brain tumors in mice

Using an artificial protein that stimulates the body’s natural immune system to fight cancer, a research team at Duke Medicine has engineered a lethal weapon that kills brain tumors in mice while sparing other tissue. If it can be shown to work in humans, it would overcome a major obstacle that has hampered the effectiveness of immune-based therapies.

The protein is manufactured with two arms – one that exclusively binds to tumor cells and another that snags the body’s fighter T-cells, spurring an attack on the tumor. In six out of eight mice with brain tumors, the treatment resulted in cures, according to findings published Dec. 17, 2012, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“This work represents a revival of a somewhat old concept that targeting cancer with tumor-specific antigens may well be the most effective way to treat cancer without toxicity,” said senior author John H. Sampson, M.D., PhD, a neurosurgeon at The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke. “But there have been problems with that approach, especially for brain tumors. Our therapeutic agent is exciting, because it acts like Velcro to bind T-cells to tumor cells and induces them to kill without any negative effects on surrounding normal tissues.”

Sampson and colleagues focused on the immune approach in brain tumors, which are notoriously difficult to treat. Despite surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, glioblastomas are universally fatal, with a median survival of 15 months.

Immunotherapies, in which the body’s B-cells and T-cells are triggered to attack tumors, have shown promise in treating brain and other cancers, but have been problematic in clinical use. Treatments have been difficult to administer at therapeutic doses, or have spurred side effects in which the immune system also attacks healthy tissue and organs.

Working to overcome those pitfalls, the Duke-led researchers designed a kind of connector - an artificial protein called a bispecific T-cell engager, or BiTE – that tethers the tumor to its killer. Their newly engineered protein includes fractions of two separate antibodies, one that recruits and engages the body’s fighter T-cells and one that expressly homes in on an antigen known as EGFRvIII, which only occurs in cancers.

Once connected via the new bispecific antibody, the T-cells recognize the tumor as an invader, and mount an attack. Normal tissue, which does not carry the tumor antigen, is left unscathed.

December152012
thewookiee2:

thewookiee2:

There’s one joke in my chemistry textbook.

I’M STILL LAUGHING AT THIS

thewookiee2:

thewookiee2:

There’s one joke in my chemistry textbook.

I’M STILL LAUGHING AT THIS

(via ofmachinesandmen)

November152012
November102012

Feel-good hormone helps to jog the memory
The feel-good hormone dopamine improves long-term memory. This is the finding of a team lead by Emrah Düzel, neuroscientist at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Magdeburg. The researchers investigated test subjects ranging in age from 65 to 75 years, who were given a precursor of dopamine. Treated subjects performed better in a memory test than a comparison group, who had taken a placebo. The study provides new insights into the formation of long lasting memories and also has implications for understanding why memories fade more rapidly following the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. The results appear in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Feel-good hormone helps to jog the memory

The feel-good hormone dopamine improves long-term memory. This is the finding of a team lead by Emrah Düzel, neuroscientist at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Magdeburg. The researchers investigated test subjects ranging in age from 65 to 75 years, who were given a precursor of dopamine. Treated subjects performed better in a memory test than a comparison group, who had taken a placebo. The study provides new insights into the formation of long lasting memories and also has implications for understanding why memories fade more rapidly following the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. The results appear in the Journal of Neuroscience.

(via neurosciencestuff)

October272012

the-best-revenge-is-living-well:

expose-the-light:

Ingredients of life

Illustrations of Chemical compounds by Avkari Alon

Hah. Happiness really is so simple. And love… now that, on the other hand, is ever so complicated. Hahaha.

(via twistedtheory)

October242012
venusian-eyes:

buttsbutts:

Get it because it’s a CELL WALL

oh my god

venusian-eyes:

buttsbutts:

Get it because it’s a CELL WALL

oh my god

(via clumsy-vanity)

October182012
biocanvas:

A cut across the central vein of a leaf from Acrostichum aureum, a mangrove fern, at 20-times magnification.
Image by Daphne Zbaeren-Colbourn.

biocanvas:

A cut across the central vein of a leaf from Acrostichum aureum, a mangrove fern, at 20-times magnification.

Image by Daphne Zbaeren-Colbourn.

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